Christian Meissner is Professor of Psychology at Iowa State University. He holds a
Ph.D. in Cognitive & Behavioral Science from Florida State University (2001) and
conducts empirical studies on the psychological processes underlying investigative
interviews, including issues surrounding eyewitness recall and identification, deception
detection, and interrogations and confessions. He has published numerous peer-reviewed
journal articles and book chapters, and his research has been funded by the National
Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Department of Justice, and
the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. He has served on advisory panels for the
National Science Foundation, the National Academy of Sciences, the U.S. Department of
Defense, and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and currently serves on the
editorial board of several prominent academic journals. From 2010-2012, he served as
Program Director of Law & Social Sciences at the National Science Foundation. In
2008, Dr. Meissner received the Saleem Shah Award for "Early Career Excellence in
Psychology and Law" from the American Psychology-Law Society and the American
Academy of Forensic Psychology. In 2011, Drs. Meissner and Lassiter were awarded the
American Psychology-Law Society Book Award and the American Publisher's PROSE Award
for "Professional and Scholarly Excellence in Psychology" for their edited
volume, "Police Interrogations and False Confessions: Current Research, Practice,
and Policy Recommendations". Most recently, Dr. Meissner received the 2013 Academic
Excellence Award from the International Investigative Interviewing Research Group. He
currently serves as President of the (international) Society for Applied Research in
Memory & Cognition, and has been elected as a Fellow of the Association for
Psychological Science and the Psychonomic Society. 

Applied Memory (Eyewitnesses, False Recall)

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The need for expert psychological testimony on eyewitness identification (with Roy S. Malpass, Stephen J. Ross, and Jessica L. Marcon), Expert testimony on the psychology of eyewitness identification (2009)
 

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Accuracy of eyewitness descriptions (with Kyle J. Susa), Encyclopedia of Psychology & Law (2008)
 

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A “middle road” approach to bridging the basic-applied divide in eyewitness identification research (with Sean M. Lane), Applied Cognitive Psychology (2008)

Over a century of laboratory research has explored the mechanisms of memory using a variety...

 

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A theoretical and meta-analytic review of the relationship between verbal descriptions and identification accuracy in memory for faces (with Siegfried L. Sporer and Kyle J. Susa), European Journal of Cognitive Psychology (2008)

Verbal descriptions can sometimes impair (or “overshadow”) and other times facilitate subsequent attempts at perceptual...

 

Cross-Racial Person Identification

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Modeling the role of social-cognitive processes in the recognition of own- and other-race faces (with Kyle J. Susa and Hendrik de Heer), Social Cognition (2010)

Known as the cross-race effect (CRE), psychological research has consistently shown that people are less...

 

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Perceptual identification and the cross-race effect (with Jessica L. Marcon, Michael Frueh, Kyle J. Susa, and Otto H. MacLin), Visual Cognition (2010)

The current research examined whether the cross-race effect (CRE) was evident in perceptual identification tasks...

 

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Assessing the influence of recollection and familiarity in memory for own- vs. other-race faces (with Jessica L. Marcon and Kyle J. Susa), Psychonomic Bulletin & Review (2009)

The current research examined the contributions of recollection vs. familiarity in memory for own- and...

 

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Cross-racial lineup identification: The potential benefits of context reinstatement (with Jacqueline R. Evans and Jessica L. Marcon), Psychology, Crime, & Law (2009)

The current research examined the potential benefit of context reinstatement on the cross-race effect in...

 

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Cross-race effect in eyewitness identification (with Jessica L. Marcon and Roy S. Malpass), Encyclopedia of Psychology & Law (2008)
 

Forensic Science

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Special issue on forensic science (Part 1) (with Kenneth G. Furton), Canadian Journal of Police & Security Services (2005)
 

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Special issue on forensic science (Part 2) (with Kenneth G. Furton), Canadian Journal of Police & Security Services (2005)
 

Interviewing, Interrogation, & Credibility Assessment

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Minimization and maximization techniques: Assessing the perceived consequences of confessing and confession diagnosticity (with Allyson J. Horgan, Melissa B. Russano, and Jacqueline R. Evans), Psychology, Crime, & Law (2011)

Identifying interrogation strategies that minimize the likelihood of obtaining false information, without compromising the ability...

 

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Modeling the influence of investigator bias on the elicitation of true and false confessions (with Fadia M. Narchet and Melissa B. Russano), Law & Human Behavior (2011)

The aim of this study was to model various social and cognitive processes believed to...

 

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Criminal versus HUMINT interrogations: The importance of psychological science to improving interrogative practice. (with Jacqueline R. Evans, Susan E. Brandon, Melissa B. Russano, and Steven M. Kleinman), Journal of Psychiatry & Law (2010)

The discovery of many cases of wrongful conviction in the criminal justice system involving admissions...

 

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The Cognitive Interview: A meta-analytic review and study space analysis of the past 25 years (with Amina Memon and Joanne Fraser), Psychology, Public Policy, & Law (2010)

The Cognitive Interview (CI) is a well-established protocol for interviewing witnesses. The current article presents...

 

Juror Decision-Making

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The effects of accomplice witnesses and jailhouse informants on jury decision making (with Jeffrey S. Neuschatz, Deah S. Lawson, Jessica K. Swanner, and Joseph S. Neuschatz), Law & Human Behavior (2008)

The present study presents one of the first investigations of the effects of accomplice witnesses...

 
Racial bias in juror decision-making: A meta-analytic review of defendant treatment (with Tara L. Mitchell, Ryann M. Haw, and Jeffrey E. Pfeifer), Law & Human Behavior (2005)

Common wisdom seems to suggest that racial bias, defined as disparate treatment of minority defendants,...

 
Jury nullification: The influence of judicial instruction on the relationship between attitudes and juridic decision-making (with John C. Brigham and Jeffrey E. Pfeifer), Basic & Applied Social Psychology (2003)

Prior research on jury nullification has suggested that individuals tend to operate on their “sentiments”...