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About Sally Greene

Welcome! While pursuing a career in law and public policy, I remain active as in independent scholar affiliated with UNC-Chapel Hill. The common theme that animates my professional career and my contributions to scholarship is a trust in the power of ideas, powerfully communicated, to inspire thoughtful dialogue.
My work on Judge Thomas Ruffin and Albion Tourgee--in both cases associated with public humanities conferences--recovers lost or neglected stories about slavery and freedom in nineteenth-century North Carolina. We are still living with the implications of these stories.
The essay on Elizabeth Spencer, a great southern writer of the twentieth and now twenty-first century, also invokes a neglected episode in the nineteenth-century history of black freedom.
The earlier works on Virginia Woolf come out of my graduate studies and dissertation. Woolf remains my muse in the art of reading and the challenges of political thought.

Positions

Present Research collaborator, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
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Honors and Awards

  • American Fellowship, AAUW, 1994


Memory studies (1)

Literary criticism (6)

Personal essay (1)