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Article
Somatic dysfunction and use of osteopathic manual treatment techniques during ambulatory medical care visits: a CONCORD-PRBN study
Journal of the American Osteopathic Association
  • John C. Licciardone
  • Cathleen M. Kearns
  • Hollis H, King
  • Michael A. Seffinger
  • W. Thomas Crow
  • Peter Zajac
  • William H. Devine
  • Reem Y. Abu_Sbaih
  • Stephen J. Miller
  • Murray R. Berkowitz, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2014
Abstract
Context: Osteopathic manual treatment (OMT) of somatic dysfunction is a unique approach to medical care that may be studied within a practice-based research network. Objective: To measure patient characteristics and osteopathic physician practice patterns within the Consortium for Collaborative Osteopathic Research Development– Practice-Based Research Network (CONCORD-PBRN). Design: Cross-sectional card study. Setting: Eleven member clinics within the CONCORD-PBRN coordinated by The Osteopathic Research Center. Patients: A total of 668 patients seen between January and March 2013. Main Study Measures: Patient age and sex; primary diagnoses; somatic dysfunction as manifested by tenderness, asymmetry, restricted motion, or tissue texture changes; and use of 14 OMT techniques. Results were stratified by anatomical region and adjusted for clustering within member clinics. Clustering was measured by the intracluster correlation coefficient. Results: Patient ages ranged from 7 days to 87 years (adjusted mean age, 49.2 years; 95% confidence interval [CI], 43.3-55.1 years). There were 450 females (67.4%) and 508 patient visits (76.0%) involved a primary diagnosis of disease of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue. Structural examination was performed during 657 patient visits (98.4%), and 649 visits (97.2%) involved OMT. Restricted motion and tenderness were the most and least common palpatory findings, respectively. Cranial (1070 [14.5%]), myofascial release (1009 [13.7%]), muscle energy (1001 [13.6%]), and counterstrain (980 [13.3%]) techniques were most commonly used, accounting for more than one-half of the OMT provided. Pediatric patients were more likely than adults to receive OMT within the head (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 9.53; 95% CI, 1.28- 71.14). Geriatric patients were more likely than adults to receive a structural examination (adjusted OR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.09-3.07) and OMT (adjusted OR, 1.62; 1.02-2.59) within the lower extremity. Females were more likely than males to receive a structural examination (adjusted OR, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.44-4.16) and OMT (adjusted OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.26-3.52) within the sacrum and OMT within the pelvis (adjusted OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.12-2.88). Intracluster correlation coefficients for the 4 most commonly used OMT techniques ranged from 0.34 to 0.72. Conclusion: This study provides proof of concept of the feasibility of studying osteopathic medical practice on a national level by developing and growing the CONCORD-PBRN.
Comments

This article was originally published in Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, Volume 114, Number 5

Th published version is available online at http://dx.doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2014.072

Copyright © 2014, the American Osteopathic Association

Citation Information
John C. Licciardone, Cathleen M. Kearns, Hollis H, King, Michael A. Seffinger, et al.. "Somatic dysfunction and use of osteopathic manual treatment techniques during ambulatory medical care visits: a CONCORD-PRBN study" Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Vol. 114 Iss. 5 (2014) p. 344 - 354
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/murray_berkowitz/2/