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About Craig Campbell

Dr. Craig Campbell is a pediatric neurologist at the Children's Hospital (LHSC) researching management and outcomes of neuromuscular diseases in children such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy, and myotonic dystrophy.

Children's Health Collaborators: Kathy Speechley, Victoria Mok Siu, and Douglas Fraser, Lisa Hoffman

Dr. Campbell's team is involved in clinical trials for novel therapeutics including antisense oligonucleotides, nonsense readthroughs, and gene therapies, with focus on study of quality of life, fatigue, and outcome measures. Dr. Campbell is also involved in research surrounding cerebral palsy, genotype/phenotype studies, and traumatic brain injuries.
 
Dr. Campbell heads the pediatric side of the Canadian Neuromuscular Disease Registry and chairs the TREAT-NMD Global Disease Oversight Committee, networks of rare neuromuscular disease registries designed to facilitate clinical trials and to generate real world evidence (RWE) for evaluating natural history.



Dr. Campbell joined the Department of Paediatrics and Clinical Neurological Sciences at the Children's Hospital in 2003 following fellowship training at the University of Ottawa. Dr. Campbell has Canadian certification in electromyography (EMG) and neurophysiology and runs the paediatric EMG/NCS clinic at the Children's Hospital. In addition, he is the Medical Director of the Neuromuscular and Cerebral Palsy clinics. He is currently the Head of the Section of Paediatric Neurology and the Deputy Chair of Reseach in the Department of Paediatrics.

Dr. Campbell has completed his Masters of Science in Community Medicine and Epidemiology is an Associate Scientist at the Child Health Research Institute and an Associate Professor at Western University. His research interests include neuromuscular disease in children and cerebral palsy. He is the Director of the William Singeris National Centre for Myotonic Dystrophy Research, which is conducting a Canadian study examining health outcomes in children with congenital myotonic dystrophy. Dr. Campbell is the Paediatric Lead of the Canadian Neuromuscular Disease Registry and a member of multiple international Neuromuscular Research Groups.


Bio Sketch
Dr. Campbell earned his MD from University of Ottawa in 1996. He completed his Neurology fellowship and Masters in Clinical Epidemiology at the same institution. Dr. Campbell is Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Epidemiology at Western University. He is the medical director of the Pediatric Neuromuscular Clinic at the Thames Valley Children's Centre. Dr. Campbell runs the Pediatric EMG/NCS laboratory at the Children's Hospital of Western Ontario.

Research
Dr. Campbell's research and clinical interests are in the areas of Cerebral Palsy and Pediatric Neuromuscular disease.

Medical Interests
Neuromuscular Disorders, Electromyography (EMG: disease of peripheral nerve and muscle), Pediatric Neurology


Research Interest Area: Neurological disorders; Chronic diseases; Quality of life/rehab

What is your name?
Craig Campbell, MD

What is your official job title?
Pediatric Neurologist , Children’s Hospital – London Health Sciences Centre, Associate Professor,Department of Epidemiology and Clinical Neurological Sciences, Western University, Scientist, Children’s Health Research Institute

At what institution(s) do you work?
Children’s Hospital – London Health Sciences Centre

In lay terms, what is the focus of your research as it relates to Duchenne muscular dystrophy?
The focus of our research is in Neuromuscular Disorders, specifically DMD, DM1 and SMA. We are involved in clinical trials and Investigator initiated natural history studies looking at clinical disease progression, quality of life and functional outcomes.

What is the most rewarding aspect of your role as a researcher and/or clinician?
Working alongside resilient children and their families who are living with muscle disorders day to day is the most rewarding and motivating part of my job.

How does the funding you receive from Jesse’s Journey make a difference to your research? What are you currently doing that you could not do without funding from Jesse’s Journey?
We have been very fortunate to have been able to work with and receive funding from Jesse’s Journey for several projects. The funding provided from Jesse’s Journey was integral in the foundation of the Canadian Neuromuscular Disease Registry (CNDR). The CNDR has now been functional since 2009. The registry is a data collection tool that allows for longitudinal collection of clinical outcomes for index neuromuscular diseases including DMD. The registry also allows patients to be informed about research studies they may qualify for. The CNDR has been used by several pharmaceutical companies, and locally we have used the CNDR for the recruitment of some of our studies. We are also the lead site for Myoblast transplantation in boys with DMD that was supported in part by Jesse’s Journey. We are s site for the STEADFAST study supported by Jesse’s Journey.

Is there anything you would like to say to Duchenne families and donors of Jesse’s Journey?
Simply thank you. The people that make up the Jesse’s Journey Family are amazing advocates for the DMD community in every way!


Dr Campbell practices at the Children’s Hospital-London Health Sciences Centre and at the University of Western Ontario, where he is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Clinical Neurology, and Epidemiology and Biostatistics. He is currently the medical director of the Pediatric Neuromuscular Clinic and the Pediatric Neurophysiology Laboratory.

Dr. Campbell has focused on clinical outcomes research and understanding neuromuscular disease at a population level. He is the director of the William Singeris National Centre for Myotonic Dystrophy Research. Dr. Campbell has an active neuromuscular research program with a focus on understanding the clinical aspects of Childhood and Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, and Spinal Muscular Dystrophy. He is involved in industry and foundation sponsored clinical trials in Duchenne MD and SMA.

Positions

Present Associate Professor, Western University Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics
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Present Associate Professor, Western University Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences
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Present Chair; Division Head, Pediatric Neurology; Associate Professor, Western University Department of Paediatrics
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Present Director, Electromyography Laboratory, London Health Sciences Centre ‐ Children's Hospital
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Present Director, William Singeris National Centre for Myotonic Dystrophy Research, Lawson Health Research Institute ‐ Children's Health Research Institute (CHRI)
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Present Medical Director, Thames Valley Children's Centre ‐ Pediatric Neuromuscular and Cerebral Palsy Clinic
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Present Pediatric Neurologist, London Health Sciences Centre ‐ Children's Hospital
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Professional Service and Affiliations

Present MD MSc FRCPC, University of Western Ontario
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Research Works (40)