After suffering political persecution as a prisoner of conscience in his native
Burundi, Léonce Ndikumana now devotes his research and scholarship to improving the lives
of some of the planet’s most impoverished people. His work focuses on macroeconomic
policy in Africa, the subject of several of his books and fifty-plus articles. 

Ndikumana’s latest work, on capital flight from Africa, has had a major impact on policy
debate. It shows that the continent has suffered more than $1 trillion in capital flight
since 1970, making it an international net creditor, not a net debtor. 

After receiving tenure at UMass Amherst in 2002, Ndikumana was appointed chief of
macroeconomic analysis at the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa and
subsequently became director of development economics research at the African Development
Bank. He returned to this campus in 2011 to serve as Andrew Glyn Professor of Economics
and direct the African Policy Program at the Political Economy Research Institute. 

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Impact of sectoral allocation of foreign aid on gender equity and human development, WIDER Working Paper (2013)

While developing countries have made some progress in achieving human development since the turn of...

 

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Overcoming Low Political Equilibrium in Africa: Institutional Changes for Inclusive Development, PERI Working Papers (2013)

This paper examines the role that institutions have played in the performance of African economies...

 

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The Private Sector as Culprit and Victim of Corruption in Africa, PERI Working Paper (2013)

Corruption causes severe waste and misallocation of financial, human, and natural resources, thus retarding growth...

 

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Is There a Case for Formal Inflation Targeting in Sub-Saharan Africa? (with James Heintz), PERI Working Papers (2010)

This paper examines the question of whether inflation targeting monetary policy is an appropriate framework...

 

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Potential Gains from Capital Flight Repatriation for Sub-Saharan African Countries (with Hippolyte Fofack), Economics Department Working Paper Series (2009)

Despite the recent increase in capital flows to Sub-Saharan Africa, the region remains largely marginalized...