LaTina Steele, Ph.D., is Lecturer of Biology at Sacred Heart University. 

Dr. Steele’s research interests include marine community ecology, aquatic/marine plant
chemical ecology, invasive plant ecology, and the effects of pollutants on coastal
ecosystems. Her specific research areas include: The role of chemical interactions in
determining invasion success of non-native aquatic plants. Using native herbivores to
mitigate invasive aquatic plants. Using stable isotopes to examine habitat connectivity.
Effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on seagrass physiology and coastal fish
communities. Effects of habitat and predator diversity on salt marsh community structure.
The role of phenolic compounds as inducible chemical defenses against herbivory and
pathogenic infection in seagrasses. 

Degrees: Ph.D. in Marine Sciences, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (2010); B.S.
in Biology, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (2004). 

Articles

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Sarpa salpa Herbivory on Shallow Reaches of Posidonia oceanica Beds (with Kelly M. Darnell, Just Cebrián, and Jose Luis Sanchez-Lizaso), Biology Faculty Publications (2014)

Here, we examined the temporal and small-scale spatial variability of grazing by the herbivorous fish...

 

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Idiosyncratic Responses of Seagrass Phenolic Production Following Sea Urchin Grazing (with John F. Valentine), Biology Faculty Publications (2012)

While chemical defenses can determine plant persistence in terrestrial ecosystems and some marine macroalgae, their...

 

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Seagrass–Pathogen Interactions: ‘Pseudo-Induction’ of Turtlegrass Phenolics Near Wasting Disease Lesions (with Melanie Caldwell, Anne Boettcher, and Tom Arnold), Biology Faculty Publications (2005)

Marine protists of the genus Labyrinthula cause the seagrass wasting disease, which is associated with...