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Autotomy of the Posterior Foot in Agaronia propatula (Caenogastropoda: Olividae) Occurs in Animals that are Fully Withdrawn into their Shells
Journal of Molluscan Studies (2011)
  • Samantha D. Rupert
  • Winfried S. Peters
Abstract
This paper has no abstract; this is the first paragraph. Autotomy is the active shedding of a body part which occurs in a variety of emergency situations including attacks by predators (Stasek, 1967; McVean, 1975; Maginnis, 2006). The immediate advantage of autotomy – surviving an otherwise deadly attack – comes at a price, which may include physical, energetic, behavioural and reproductive costs (Cooper, 2003; Maginnis, 2006). While the evolutionary and ecological consequences of autotomy have been studied most thoroughly in lizards (Clause & Capaldi, 2006; Bateman & Fleming, 2009), the phenomenon also is known from numerous invertebrate taxa, where it involves a wide variety of body structures (Fleming, Muller & Bateman, 2007). In the Mollusca autotomy occurs in bivalves, scaphopods, gastropods and cephalopods; the older literature was summarized by Stasek (1967). Several additional cases have been reported more recently, mostly without detailed information on mechanisms and ecological implications (e.g. Warmke & Almodóvar, 1972; Hughes & Emerson, 1987).
Keywords
  • Autotomy,
  • Olividae,
  • Agaronia
Publication Date
November 1, 2011
Citation Information

Samantha D. Rupert and Winfried S. Peters. Autotomy of the Posterior Foot in Agaronia propatula (Caenogastropoda: Olividae) Occurs in Animals that are Fully Withdrawn into their Shells. Journal of Molluscan Studies (2011) 77: 437-440.

doi: 10.1093/mollus/eyr019