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Unpublished Paper
IS FLORIDA STILL A STATE? THE IMPLICATIONS OF THE ABROGATION OF THE ADAMS-DeONIS TREATY ON FLORIDA'S STATUS UNDER INTERNATIONAL LAW.
ExpressO (2008)
  • william pena wells
Abstract

The United States acquired the Spanish colonies of East and West Florida in 1819 by virtue of the Adams-deOnis Treaty. At the close of the Spanish American War of 1898, the United States and Spain signed a treaty which “abrogated” and "annulled” all prior treaties, including the Adams-deOnis Treaty. This article proposes that having handed over sovereignty of the Florida territory, the United States merely occupies the area as a colonial power, subject to the provisions of the United Nations Charter, which provides for territorial self-determination of colonial peoples.

Keywords
  • treaty,
  • treaty research,
  • abrogation,
  • jurisdiction,
  • united nations,
  • colonialism,
  • florida,
  • florida statehood,
  • spanish american war
Disciplines
Publication Date
2008
Citation Information
william pena wells. "IS FLORIDA STILL A STATE? THE IMPLICATIONS OF THE ABROGATION OF THE ADAMS-DeONIS TREATY ON FLORIDA'S STATUS UNDER INTERNATIONAL LAW." ExpressO (2008)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/william_wells/1/