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Article
Murder and Capital-Punishment in the Evolving Context of the Post-Furman Era
Social Forces
  • Ruth D. Peterson, Ohio State University
  • William C. Bailey, Cleveland State University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
3-1-1988
Disciplines
Abstract
In view of (1) escalating national attention, and political and judicial activity centering on capital punishment during the past decade and a half, and (2) concomitant changes in homicides this paper investigates the impact of the death penalty on state homicide rates for the post-Furman period, 1973 -84 The research also addresses the debate over the relative merits of the contiguous state matching strategy versus multiple regression as a means of controlling for the influence of possible confounding factors in examining the capital punishment/homicide relationship. The two approaches yield quite similar results. Consistent with a long line of deterrence research, the analysis produces no indication that our national return to capital punishment since Furman has had a systematic downward impact on homicide.
DOI
10.2307/2579575
Version
Postprint
Citation Information
Peterson, R. C., W. C. Bailey. (1988). Murder and Capital Punishment in the Evolving Context of the Post-Furman Era. Social Forces, 66(2), 774-807.