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Article
Fluxes, sizes, morphology and compositions of particles in the Mt. Erebus volcanic plume, December 1983
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry
  • Raymond L. Chuan, Brunswick Corporation
  • Julie Palais, The Ohio State University
  • William I. Rose, Michigan Technological University
  • Philip R. Kyle, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
12-1-1986
Abstract
Use of an airborne quartz crystal microbalance cascade impactor instrument together with a correlation spectrometer has allowed the flux of particles and their size distribution to be determined at Mount Erebus. The plume contributes 21±3 metric tomnes/day of aerosol particles to the Antarctic upper troposphere. The aerosol particles consist of larger (5–25 μm) particles of elemental sulfur and silica, a middle sized group of iron oxides and smaller particles (less than 1 μm) of complex liquids. Unlike many volcanic plumes, the Erebus plume has only a small amount of sulfate particles. The concentrations of particles in the Erebus plumes was 70–370 μm/m3. Limited sampling of the Antarctic atmosphere at 8 km altitude but hundreds of km away from Erebus obtained a few large particles of sulfur and silicates, suggesting a similarity with the Erebus plume. The fallout of these particles occurs slowly over a broad area of the Antarctic continent.
Publisher's Statement

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1986. Publisher's version of record: https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00053846

Citation Information
Raymond L. Chuan, Julie Palais, William I. Rose and Philip R. Kyle. "Fluxes, sizes, morphology and compositions of particles in the Mt. Erebus volcanic plume, December 1983" Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry Vol. 4 Iss. 4 (1986) p. 467 - 477
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/william-rose/68/