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Article
Effectiveness of Elicitation Techniques in Distributed Requirements Engineering
Requirements Engineering, 2002. Proceedings. IEEE Joint International Conference On
  • Wesley James Lloyd, University of Washington Tacoma
  • Mary Beth Rosson
  • James D. Arthur
Publication Date
1-1-2002
Document Type
Conference Proceeding
Abstract
Software development teams are often geographically distributed from their customers and end users. This creates significant communication and coordination challenges that impact the effectiveness of requirements engineering. Travel costs, and the local availability of quality technical staff increase the demand for effective distributed software development teams. This research reports an empirical study of how groupware can be used to aid distributed requirements engineering for a software development project. Six groups of seven to nine members were formed and divided into separate remote groups of customers and engineers. The engineers conducted a requirements analysis and produced a software requirements specification (SRS) document through distributed interaction with the remote customers. We present results and conclusions from the research including: an analysis of factors that effected the quality of the Software Requirements Specification document written at the conclusion of the requirements process and the effectiveness of requirements elicitation techniques which were used in a distributed setting for requirements gathering.
Citation Information
Wesley James Lloyd, Mary Beth Rosson and James D. Arthur. "Effectiveness of Elicitation Techniques in Distributed Requirements Engineering" Requirements Engineering, 2002. Proceedings. IEEE Joint International Conference On (2002) p. 311 - 318
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/wes-lloyd/8/