Skip to main content
Presentation
Risk of Recurrent Falls after Indoor and Outdoor Falls in the Elderly
UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat
  • Wenjun Li, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Hyung-Joo Kang, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Elizabeth Procter-Gray, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Elizabeth Procter-Gray, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Marian T. Hannan, Institute for Aging Research
  • Lewis A. Lipsitz, Institute for Aging Research
Start Date
20-5-2014 12:30 PM
Description

Background: Falls are the most common and serious health problems of the elderly. The primary goal of the study is to determine whether risk for recurrent indoor and outdoor falls differ by type of previous falls and by gender.

Method: We analyzed data on falls collected in the MOBILIZE Boston prospective cohort study of community-dwelling women and men aged 65 years or older. The participants were followed for up to 4.3 years (median=2.3y). Logistic regression models, clustered by participant, were performed to estimate the probability of a subsequent indoor or outdoor fall after any fall, indoor fall, and outdoor fall. Natural log transformed time since the most recent any fall, time since the most recent indoor fall, and time since the most recent outdoor fall were used to predict probabilities of a subsequent fall of each type.

Result: Among 502 participants who reported at least one fall during the follow-up, 330 had at least one reccurent fall during the follow-up period. Men and women differed in their tendencies to fall recurrently as well as in their response to an outdoor fall. Median time to the recurrent any fall since the most recent any fall was 9 weeks (IQR=22) for men and 17 weeks (IQR=30) for women [p= <0.001]. After an outdoor fall, women displayed no change in their risk of an indoor fall, but men had an immediately higher risk for an indoor fall [p=0.003]

Conclusion: Falls, especially outdoor falls, may have different implications for the subsequent fall risks of men vs. women. Further study should examine whether outdoor falls may be an indicator of robustness for elderly women but for frailty in elderly men.

Keywords
  • Indoor fall,
  • outdoor fall,
  • recurrent fall
Comments

Abstract of poster presented at the 2014 UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat, held on May 20, 2014 at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Mass.

Creative Commons License
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Citation Information
Wenjun Li, Hyung-Joo Kang, Elizabeth Procter-Gray, Elizabeth Procter-Gray, et al.. "Risk of Recurrent Falls after Indoor and Outdoor Falls in the Elderly" (2014)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/wenjun_li/107/