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Article
Choosing work and care: four Australian women negotiating return to paid work in the first year of motherhood
Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood
  • Wendy Boyd, Southern Cross University
  • Susan Walker, Queensland University of Technology
  • Karen Thorpe, Queensland University of Technology
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2013
Peer Reviewed
Peer-Reviewed
Abstract
Australian women make decisions about return to paid work and care for their child within a policy environment that presents mixed messages about maternal employment and child care standards. Against this background an investigation of first-time mothers’ decision-making about workforce participation and child care was undertaken. Four women were studied from pregnancy through the first postnatal year using interview and diary methods. Inductive analyses identified three themes, all focused on dimensions of family security: financial security relating to family income, emotional security relating to child care quality, and pragmatic security relating to child care access. The current policy changes that aim to increase child care quality standards in Australia present a positive step toward alleviating family insecurities but are insufficient to alleviate the evidently high levels of tension between workforce participation and family life experienced by women transitioning back into the workforce in Australia.
Disciplines
Citation Information

Boyd, W, Walker, S & Thorpe, K 2013, 'Choosing work and care: four Australian women negotiating return to paid work in the first year of motherhood', Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood Education, vol. 14, no. 2, pp.168-178.

Published version available from:

http://dx.doi.org/10.2304/ciec.2013.14.2.168