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Article
Marshmallows Used as Saliva Stimulant Do Not Affect Cortisol Concentrations: Finally a Palatable Alternative for Toddler Saliva Collection
Developmental Psychobiology
  • Andrea D. Clements, East Tennessee State University
  • C. Richard Parker, University of Alabama
  • Wallace E. Dixon, Jr., East Tennessee State University
  • Brenda Salley, Virginia Polytechnic Institute
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
10-17-2007
Description

Two studies were conducted to validate marshmallows as a saliva stimulant for use with toddlers. First, cortisol concentrations from 14 subjects (ages 6–46 years) were compared using three saliva collection methods: (1) plain cotton dental roll, (2) dental roll with one mini-marshmallow, and (3) expectorating into a collection tube using no cotton or stimulant. EIA was used for analyses. There were no significant differences among cortisol concentrations. Second, saliva collection compliance rate was compared for 21-month-olds (n = 51) using either flavored drink crystal- (compliance rate = 16.7%) or marshmallow-flavored (compliance rate = 60%) dental rolls for saliva collection (χ2 )1) = 4.02, p = .045). These studies indicate that marshmallow is a viable option for saliva stimulation to determine toddler cortisol concentrations using EIA.

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Citation Information
Andrea D. Clements, C. Richard Parker, Wallace E. Dixon and Brenda Salley. "Marshmallows Used as Saliva Stimulant Do Not Affect Cortisol Concentrations: Finally a Palatable Alternative for Toddler Saliva Collection" Developmental Psychobiology Vol. 49 Iss. 7 (2007) p. 702 - 707 ISSN: 1098-2302
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/wallace-dixon/31/