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Place matters: Consensual features and regional variation in american well-being and self.
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (2002)
  • V C Plaut, Berkeley Law
  • H R Markus
Abstract

Consensual and regionally distinct features of well-being and self were examined in a nationally representative survey of midlife Americans (ages 25-75). Consistent with key American ideology, Study 1 found that a majority of Americans believe they have high levels of mastery, purpose, life satisfaction, overall health, family and work obligation, and partner and family support. Study 2 found distinct regional well-being profiles (e.g., New England reflected concern with not being constrained by others; Mountain showed concern with environmental mastery; West South Central with personal growth and feeling cheerful and happy; West North Central with feeling calm, peaceful, and satisfied, and East South Central with contributing to others' well-being). Study 3 found regional self profiles consistent with the well-being profiles.

Disciplines
Publication Date
2002
Citation Information
V C Plaut and H R Markus. "Place matters: Consensual features and regional variation in american well-being and self." Journal of Personality and Social Psychology Vol. 83 Iss. 1 (2002)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/victoria_plaut/29/