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Article
Coloured South Africans: a Middleman Minority of Another Kind
Social Identities: Journal for the Study of Race, Nation and Culture (2016)
  • Vernon D Johnson
Abstract
Beginning in the 1940s, a literature on middleman minorities emerged to demystify the intermediary economic niche that Jews had occupied in medieval Europe. They were viewed as ethnic entrepreneurs occupying the economic status gap. In the 1960s, scholars began to systematically apply middleman minority theory to colonial societies and to American society. South Africa also has classic middleman minorities: immigrants from South Asia. This article identifies Coloured South Africans as a middleman minority of another type: semi-privileged proletarians. It also offers a typology contrasting ethnic entrepreneurs to semi-privileged proletarians.
Keywords
  • Status gap,
  • Ethnic entrepreneurs,
  • Semi-privileged
Disciplines
Publication Date
May 16, 2016
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13504630.2016.1175930
Publisher Statement
Taylor & Francis Group
Citation Information
Vernon D Johnson. "Coloured South Africans: a Middleman Minority of Another Kind" Social Identities: Journal for the Study of Race, Nation and Culture Vol. 23 Iss. 1 (2016) p. 4 - 28
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/vernon-johnson/4/