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Article
The Ville: Jim Crow Schools as Defined by an African-American, Middle-Class Neighborhood
Journal of Philosophy & History of Education (2019)
  • Vanessa Garry, University of Missouri-St. Louis
Abstract
From the early 1900s to mid-century, St. Louis, Missouri witnessed The Ville neighborhood transform from being the home of African American servants to German immigrants to the middleclass elite comprised of professionals and laborers. Its twenty-four blocks were on the outskirts of St. Louis which helped it evade covenants preventing integration. The Ville, situated Northwest of the city was St. Louis’ Harlem Renaissance. Its residents, educators, doctors, nurses, laborers, and businessmen, strategically built an enclave that included St. Louis Public Schools from kindergarten to college, a first-class hospital, community center, and nearby business district. Though the Ville’s inhabitants were treated as second-class citizens, they wittingly developed the neighborhood with institutions to serve the broader community by strategically organizing and leveraging the strengths of leaders in the community from all walks of life.  
Disciplines
Publication Date
Summer 2019
Citation Information
Vanessa Garry. "The Ville: Jim Crow Schools as Defined by an African-American, Middle-Class Neighborhood" Journal of Philosophy & History of Education Vol. 69 Iss. 1 (2019) p. 15 - 26
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/vanessa-garry/9/