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Article
Women’s Pathways Into Activism: Rethinking the Women’s Environmental Justice Narrative in California’s San Joaquin Valley
Organization and Environment (2012)
  • Tracy Perkins, Howard University
Abstract
This article explores women’s pathways to participation in environmental justice advocacy in California’s San Joaquin Valley. Many scholars find that women become environmental justice activists according to a common set of experiences in which apolitical women personally experience an environmental problem that launches them into a life activism to protect the health of their families. Although a small group of the 25 women the author interviewed fit this description, overall the interviews reveal a much more diverse array of paths into environmental justice activism. The author’s data complicate the idea that environmental justice activism is the first political activity for most women environmental justice activists and that they are motivated to become activists primarily in order to protect the health of their families. The author discusses the significance of these findings and concludes with a call for scholars to revisit the question of women’s pathways into environmental justice activism.
Keywords
  • gender,
  • environmental justice,
  • social movements
Publication Date
March, 2012
DOI
10.1177/1086026612445390
Citation Information
Tracy Perkins. "Women’s Pathways Into Activism: Rethinking the Women’s Environmental Justice Narrative in California’s San Joaquin Valley" Organization and Environment Vol. 25 Iss. 1 (2012) p. 76 - 94
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/tracy-perkins/3/