Skip to main content
Other
Theoretical Considerations for Extracting Meaning from Personal Profile System Data: The Need for Independent Construct Validity Studies
Publications
  • Thomas G. Henkel, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
  • James Noel Wilmoth, Auburn University
Submitting Campus
Worldwide
Department
Management & Technology
Document Type
Report
Publication/Presentation Date
1-1-1988
Abstract/Description

The Personal Profile System (PPS) is a psychological testing instrument that has been widely used. The construct validity of the PPS was studied through a review of the literature. This paper organizes the literature review into three broad categories: the background of the PPS; the reliability of the PPS; and the validity of the PPS. The PPS is a self-scoring instrument measuring the behavioral responses of people along four dimensions: (1) dominance; (2) influencing; (3) steadiness; and (4) compliance. The instrument is designed to provide a systematic and comprehensive perception of an individual's behavioral tendencies and the behavioral tendencies of those with whom the individual comes in contact. Claiming construct validity for an instrument implies evidence that the instrument measures the construct or trait. This review of empirical literature on the PPS found little data concerning its reliability. Several studies offer support of its criterion-related validity. Studies on construct validity were reviewed but provide inconsistent results. None were based on factor analysis which could provide credibility for the instrument. Principal components analysis, followed by orthogonal and oblique rotation, is recommended to affirm the number of common dimensions of the PPS. Four tables, 1 figure, and a 37-item list of references are provided. (SLD)

Location
Washington D.C.
Paper Number
ED324344
Number of Pages
30
Citation Information
Thomas G. Henkel and James Noel Wilmoth. "Theoretical Considerations for Extracting Meaning from Personal Profile System Data: The Need for Independent Construct Validity Studies" (1988)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/tom_g_henkel/14/