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Article
Effects of Initial-Link Duration on Preference and Resistance to Change in Concurrent-Chains Schedules
Behavioural Processes (2009)
  • Corina Jimenez-Gomez, Utah State University
  • Christopher A. Podlesnik, Utah State University
  • Timothy A. Shahan, Utah State University
Abstract

Previous studies with concurrent-chains procedures have shown that preference for a terminal-link signaling a higher reinforcement rate decreases as initial-link durations increase. Using a concurrent-chains procedure, the present experiment examined the effects of manipulating initial-link duration on preference and resistance to disruption with rats nose poking for different rates of food reinforcement in the terminal links. Consistent with previous findings, preference for a terminal link with a higher reinforcement rate decreased with longer initial links. Conversely, relative resistance to disruption in the terminal link with a higher reinforcement rate increased with longer initial links. These findings are counter to the prediction of behavioral momentum theory that preference and resistance to change should be positively related.

Keywords
  • Behavioral momentum theory,
  • Concurrent chains,
  • Preference,
  • Resistance to change,
  • Nose poke,
  • Rat
Publication Date
January 1, 2009
Publisher Statement
Originally published by Elsevier. Publisher's PDF and HTML fulltext available through remote link.
Citation Information
Jimenez-Gomez, C., Podlesnik, C. A. & Shahan, T. A. (2009). Effects of initial-link duration on preference and resistance to change in concurrent-chains schedules. Behavioural Processes, 81, 223-226.