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Article
Challenges to the conceptualization and measurement of religiosity and spirituality in mental health research.
Faculty Publications
  • Rachel Baumsteiger
  • Tiffany Chenneville
SelectedWorks Author Profiles:

Tiffany Chenneville

Document Type
Article
Publication Date
2015
Date Issued
January 2015
Date Available
June 2016
Disciplines
Abstract

Investigating religiosity and spirituality may help to further elucidate how individuals' worldviews influence their attitudes, behavior, and overall well-being. However, inconsistencies in how these constructs are conceptualized and measured may undercut the potential value of religiosity and spirituality research. Results from a survey of undergraduate students suggest that laypeople define spirituality as independent from social influence and that few people associate religiosity with negative terms. A content analysis of spirituality measures indicates that spirituality measures contain items that do not directly measure the strength of spirituality. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Comments
Abstract only. Full-text article is available through licensed access provided by the publisher. Published in Journal of Religion & Health, 54(6), 2344-2354. doi: 10.1007/s10943-015-0008-7. Members of the USF System may access the full-text of the article through the authenticated link provided.
Language
en_US
Publisher
Springer
Creative Commons License
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0
Citation Information
Baumsteiger, R. & Chenneville, T. (2015). Challenges to the conceptualization and measurement of religiosity and spirituality in mental health research. Journal of Religion & Health, 54(6), 2344-2354. doi: 10.1007/s10943-015-0008-7