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Invisible Americans: Migration, Transnationalism, and the Politics of Difference in HIV/AIDS Research.
Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism (2008)
  • Thurka Sangaramoorthy, University of Maryland - College Park
Abstract
Using the scholarship on transnationalism and citizenship, this paper examines the politics of difference in HIV/AIDS prevention programmes in the United States and their impact on Haitian migrants and immigrants. It finds that there is a tremendous amount of complex movement of knowledge production and expertise among various constituents who work in the field of HIV/AIDS, and these individuals circulate ideas and technologies of HIV/AIDS across different fields in multiple ways. Through these circulations, information about HIV/ AIDS becomes entangled in the debates about relevant knowledge bases, and as a result, questions over culture and modernity. This paper traces how such discourses become framed under the rubric of risk and difference and operate at the level of situated experience. Through ethnographic fieldwork observations and interviews, this paper argues that notions of individual responsibility in HIV/AIDS risk management often become inseparable from notions of racial, ethnic and immigrant identity.
Disciplines
Publication Date
2008
Citation Information
Thurka Sangaramoorthy. "Invisible Americans: Migration, Transnationalism, and the Politics of Difference in HIV/AIDS Research." Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism Vol. 8 Iss. 2 (2008)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/thurka_sangaramoorthy/4/