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Article
86. Police interviewing behaviors and commercially sexually exploited adolescents' reluctance.
Psychology, Public Policy, and Law (2021)
  • Agnieszka M. Nogalska, University of Southern California
  • Hayden M. Henderson, University of Southern California
  • Scarlet J. Cho, University of Southern California
  • Thomas D. Lyon, University of Southern California Law School
Abstract
Little is known about the relation between law enforcement interviewing behaviors and commercially sexually exploited children’s (CSEC) reluctance. This study examined the relation between officers’ use of maximization, (references to) expertise, minimization, and support and adolescent CSEC victims’ reluctance in a small sample of police interviews (n = 2,416 question-answer pairs across ten interviews). Twenty-six percent of officers’ utterances contained at least one interviewing tactic. When statements were paired with maximization, they were correlated with more reluctance than when they were not paired with an interviewing tactic. Contrary to predictions, support was also related to greater reluctance. Open-ended (recall) questions and statements were associated with greater reluctance than closed-ended (recognition) questions. The results highlight the importance of understanding the context in which interviewing strategies are employed when assessing the relation between interviewer behavior and interviewee reluctance.
Keywords
  • maximization,
  • minimization,
  • interrogation,
  • CSEC,
  • adolescents,
  • adolescents' reluctance,
  • Police interviewing behaviors
Publication Date
Spring April 8, 2021
Citation Information
Nogalska, A.M., Henderson, H.M. Cho, S.J., & Lyon, T.D. (in press). Police interviewing behaviors and commercially sexually exploited adolescents' reluctance. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law.