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Article
Mentally ill and non-mentally-ill patients' abilities to understand informed consent disclosures for medication: preliminary data
Psychiatry Publications and Presentations
  • Thomas Grisso, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Paul S. Appelbaum, University of Massachusetts Medical School
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry
Date
8-1-1991
Document Type
Article
Medical Subject Headings
Cognition; Comprehension; Depressive Disorder; Disclosure; Heart Diseases; Hospitals; Humans; *Informed Consent; *Mental Competency; *Mentally Ill Persons; Outpatients; Patient Care; Patients; Pharmaceutical Preparations; Risk; Risk Assessment; Schizophrenia
Disciplines
Abstract
The performance of two groups of hospitalized mentally ill patients (schizophrenia and major depression) and two groups of non-mentally-ill patients (patients hospitalized for ischemic heart disease and non-ill primary care patients) was compared on a standardized, objective instrument for assessing patients' understanding of information relevant for patient decision making (consent) about treatment with medication. Generally, hospitalized schizophrenic patients manifested significantly poorer understanding of "informed consent" disclosures about potential medication than did the other groups. Considerable variance, however, was apparent within the schizophrenic group and was related to a number of clinical and demographic variables. The results are interpreted with reference to issues of competence to consent to or refuse treatment.
Rights and Permissions
Citation: Law Hum Behav. 1991 Aug;15(4):377-88.
Related Resources
Link to Article in PubMed
PubMed ID
11660092
Citation Information
Thomas Grisso and Paul S. Appelbaum. "Mentally ill and non-mentally-ill patients' abilities to understand informed consent disclosures for medication: preliminary data" Vol. 15 Iss. 4 (1991) ISSN: 0147-7307 (Linking)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/thomas_grisso/35/