Skip to main content
Article
Reductive Decomposition of Gypsum by Carbon Monoxide
Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Process Design and Development
  • Thomas D. Wheelock, Iowa State University
  • D.R. Boylan, Iowa State University
Document Type
Article
Publication Version
Published Version
Publication Date
1-1-1960
DOI
10.1021/ie50603a023
Abstract
Tremendous domestic reserves of gypsum and anhydrite constitute a potential source of raw material f i x sulfur-based chemicals. As in Europe today, calcium sulfate may become one of our principal raw materials for sulfuric acid. Several European acid plants are based on a process in which sulfur dioxide is freed from anhydrite by heating the latter with coke and shale to a sintering temperature (4). The sulfur dioxide is converted into acid and the clinker is used for portland cement.
Comments

Reprinted (adapted) with permission from Ind. Eng. Chem., 1960, 52 (3), pp 215–218. Copyright 1960 American Chemical Society.

Copyright Owner
American Chemical Society
Language
en
File Format
application/pdf
Citation Information
Thomas D. Wheelock and D.R. Boylan. "Reductive Decomposition of Gypsum by Carbon Monoxide" Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Process Design and Development Vol. 5 Iss. 3 (1960) p. 215 - 218
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/thomas-wheelock/23/