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Article
Today's threats prove to be tomorrow's promise: Higher education in 2027
Association for the Study of Higher Education Newsletter
  • Theodore J. Kowalski, University of Dayton
Document Type
Editorial
Publication Date
10-1-2002
Abstract

The effects of technology on the instructional mission of this nation's colleges and universities have been both positive and negative. While an estimated two million students, many of whom would not have had access to higher education a few decades ago, are already engaged in distance learning, this gain has been paralleled by a proliferation of inferior, profit-driven institutions and degree programs. Some observers already have predicted the demise of the modem university, claiming that a small number of independent, entrepreneurial scholars and an army of low-paid adjunct instructors using the Web and cable television will replace regular faculties in the next few decades. The obituaries for the traditional university, however, are premature.

Document Version
Published Version
Publisher
Association for the Study of Higher Education
Citation Information
Theodore J. Kowalski. "Today's threats prove to be tomorrow's promise: Higher education in 2027" Association for the Study of Higher Education Newsletter Vol. 17 Iss. 3 (2002)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/theodore_kowalski/15/