Skip to main content
Article
Clinical decision-making tools: how effective are they in improving the quality of health care?
Faculty of Health Sciences & Medicine Publications
  • Lyndal Trevana, University of Sydney
  • Kirsten McCaffery, University of Sydney
  • Glenn Salkeld, University of Sydney
  • Paul Glasziou, Bond University
  • Chris del Mar, Bond University
  • Jenny A Doust, Bond University
  • Tammy Hoffmann, Bond University
Date of this Version
6-17-2014
Document Type
Research Report
Publication Details

Citation only

Trevena, L., McCaffery, K., Salkeld, G., Glasziou, P., Del Mar, C., Doust, J., & Hoffman, T. (2014). Clinical decision-making tools: how effective are they in improving the quality of health care? Deeble Institute on Health Policy Issue Brief.

Access the site

© Copyright, The Authors, 2014

Abstract
Exec Summary Clinical decision-making tools can be considered in two broad categories – those designed to be used by clinicians and those designed to promote shared decision making with the clinician and patient together. The potential effect of computerised clinical decision support systems (CDSS) on variations in practice is not well understood, and CDSS are currently not a recommended means of improving evidence-based practice, or patient outcomes, since the mechanisms of success and failure are not well defined and the potential impact on workflows and adverse events are poorly evaluated. Despite numerous randomised controlled trials, there is poor quality evidence for the effect of CDSS on processes of care and patient outcomes. There is moderate-high quality evidence for the role of patient decision aids in preference-sensitive and shared decision making contexts. Recommendations for Commonwealth action: (i) Develop and implement CDSS standards, and ensure they align with evidence-based guidelines. (ii) Exercise caution over broader implementation of CDSS until their strengths and weaknesses are better understood. (iii) Encourage the development and implementation of shared decision-making tools for preference-sensitive decisions. (iv) Show leadership in the development of provider and consumer awareness and training, which should be developed alongside the tools themselves.
Citation Information
Lyndal Trevana, Kirsten McCaffery, Glenn Salkeld, Paul Glasziou, et al.. "Clinical decision-making tools: how effective are they in improving the quality of health care?" (2014)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/tammy_hoffmann/83/