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Article
How Accessible are the Voice-Guided Automatic Teller Machines for the Visually Impaired?
SIGDOC '12 Proceedings of the 30th ACM International Conference on Design of Communication
  • Sushil K. Oswal, University of Washington Tacoma
Publication Date
1-1-2012
Document Type
Article
Abstract

This experience report presents the results of a preliminary user study of the accessibility and usability of a set of automatic teller machines. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the voice directions for operating the machine for their accuracy, completeness, and functionality. A salient feature of the study was that the testing was conducted by a blind user with training in Information Design, Technical Communication, and Accessibility. The qualitative data gathered in this study suggests that the accessibility and usability in the present time voice-retrofitted ATM systems leaves much to desire. In fact, this researcher failed to accomplish most of the planned banking tasks on the four ATM systems tested in this study. The researcher recommends that disabled users must be engaged in the initial stages of designing such support systems so that the accessibility features could be built into the machine interface and less than satisfactory retrofits could be avoided.

DOI
10.1145/2379057.2379071
Citation Information
Sushil K. Oswal. "How Accessible are the Voice-Guided Automatic Teller Machines for the Visually Impaired?" SIGDOC '12 Proceedings of the 30th ACM International Conference on Design of Communication (2012) p. 65 - 70
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/sushil_oswal/4/