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Presentation
High Level Health Care Utilization in Severe and Difficult-to-treat Asthma [Poster]
58th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (2002)
  • Mary Lou Hayden
  • C. Johnson
  • Chantal M. Dolan
  • Susan Morris
  • Eugene R. Bleecker
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe health care utilization of patients with severe or difficult-to-treat asthma.

METHODS: Over 200 pulmonologists and allergists from academic centers, private practices and health management organizations across the United States are participating in the TENOR study. Patients 6 years and older with a diagnosis of severe or difficult-to-treat asthma were surveyed for their health care utilization.

RESULTS: 2378 patients with severe or difficult-to-treat asthma were enrolled between January 2 and May 28, 2001. Table 1 includes data on health care utilization. When stratified by lung function (FEV1 60% but <80%, >_ 80% predicted), overall there were no major differences in the data presented.
CONCLUSION: In this large cohort of severe or difficult to treat patients with asthma, we observed a high level of healthcare utilization. Of specific concern is the reported high proportion of patients requiring hospitalization or emergency care in the previous 3 months. A high percentage of patients reported a history of having been intubated or on mechanical ventilation. In addition, nearly half of the subjects reported unscheduled office visits and the requirement for oral steroid therapy, reflecting poor control of their disease. It does not appear that FEV1 alone predicts healthcare utilization. These results demonstrate the impact of severe and difficult-to-treat asthma on both patients and the health care system.
Keywords
  • asthma
Publication Date
March, 2002
Citation Information
Mary Lou Hayden, C. Johnson, Chantal M. Dolan, Susan Morris, et al.. "High Level Health Care Utilization in Severe and Difficult-to-treat Asthma [Poster]" 58th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (2002)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/susan_morris/6/