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Contribution to Book
What Do We Know about Contracting Out in the United States? Evidence from Household and Establishment Surveys
Upjohn Institute Working Papers
  • Matthew Dey, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • Susan N. Houseman, W.E. Upjohn Institute
  • Anne E. Polivka, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Year
2009
Series
Upjohn Institute Working Paper No. 09-157
**Published Version**
In Labor in the New Economy, Katharine G. Abraham, James R. Spletzer, and Michael J. Harper, eds. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010, pp. 267-304
DOI
10.17848/wp09-157
Abstract
A variety of evidence points to significant growth in domestic contracting out over the last two decades, yet the phenomenon is not well documented. In this paper, we pull together data from various sources to shed light on the extent of and trends in domestic outsourcing, the occupations in which it has grown, and the industries engaging in outsourcing for the employment services sector, which has been a particularly important area of domestic outsourcing. In addition, we examine evidence of contracting out of selected occupations to other sectors. We point to many gaps in our knowledge on trends in domestic outsourcing and its implications for employment patterns and to inconsistencies across data sets in the information that is available. We recommend steps to improve data in this area.
Issue Date
November 2007; 1st revision, May 2008; 2nd revision, September 2009
Note
First prepared for the CRIW Conference (Conference on Research in Income and Wealth) on Labor in the New Economy, Bethesda, Maryland, November 16-17, 2007
Citation Information
Dey, Matthew, Susan Houseman, and Anne Polivka. 2009. "What Do We Know about Contracting Out in the United States? Evidence from Household and Establishment Surveys." Upjohn Institute Working Paper No. 09-157. Kalamazoo, MI: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.