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MELANISM IN ENDANGERED MOHAVE TUI CHUB SIPHATELES BICOLOR MOHAVENSIS SNYDER 1918 (CYPRINIFORMES: CYPRINIDAE)
Western North American Naturalist (2010)
  • Sujan Henkanaththegedara, Longwood University
Abstract
Although melanism has been reported in a wide variety of taxa, the presence of melanic individuals is relatively
rare in fishes. Melanism in Mohave tui chub (Siphateles bicolor mohavensis), an endangered endemic of the Mojave Desert in California, is reported from 2 of 4 surveyed populations. The typical body color varies from dark brown to olive brown dorsally and is whitish ventrally; sides are silvery or golden, and fins are pale yellow to dusky red. While conducting population censuses in 2007–2008, we found 4 melanic Mohave tui chubs from 2 of 4 surveyed habitats. Two of 1049 fish (0.19%) handled from Lake Tuendae (Mojave National Preserve) and 2 of 1516 fish (0.13%) handled from Bud’s Pond (Camp Cady Wildlife Area) were melanic. Melanic individuals were dorsally black, gradually fading into blackish brown on the sides; the sides had a golden or silvery sheen, and fins were blackish brown. Though the occurrence of melanism is very rare, it may reflect underlying genetic variation, which is of particular interest to the conservation of rare and endangered species.
Disciplines
Publication Date
September 3, 2010
Citation Information
Sujan Henkanaththegedara. "MELANISM IN ENDANGERED MOHAVE TUI CHUB SIPHATELES BICOLOR MOHAVENSIS SNYDER 1918 (CYPRINIFORMES: CYPRINIDAE)" Western North American Naturalist Vol. 71 Iss. 1 (2010) p. 127 - 130 ISSN: 1944-8341
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/sujan-henkanaththegedara/6/