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Empathy, Self-Reflection, and Curriculum Choice
Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning
  • Suely Grosseman, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina
  • Mohammadreza Hojat, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Pamela M Duke, Department of Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Stewart Mennin, Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, The University of New Mexico School of Medicine, and Mennin Consulting & Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, New Mexico
  • Steven Rosenzweig, Department of Emergency Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Dennis Novack, Department of Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Disciplines
Abstract
We administered the Jefferson Scale of Empathy and the Groningen Reflection Ability Scale to 61 of 64 entering medical students who self-selected a problem-based learning curricular track and to 163 of 198 who self-selected a lecture-based track (response rates of 95.3% and 82.3%, respectively, with no statistically significant differences in mean age or sex). Mean empathy and self-reflection ability scores were significantly higher among students who chose problem-based learning. Women scored higher than men in empathy. Women choosing problem-based learning had the highest empathy scores. Studies comparing students’ performance and achievements in different curricular tracks should consider differences in personal characteristics such as capability for empathy and self-reflection that may cause students to prefer one pedagogic approach over another and affect their outcomes.
Citation Information
Suely Grosseman, Mohammadreza Hojat, Pamela M Duke, Stewart Mennin, et al.. "Empathy, Self-Reflection, and Curriculum Choice"
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/stewart_mennin/1/