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A television in the bedroom is associated with higher weekday screen time among youth with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD)
Preventive and Behavioral Medicine Publications and Presentations
  • Charmaine B. Lo, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Molly E. Waring, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Sherry L. Pagoto, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Stephenie C. Lemon, University of Massachusetts Medical School
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Clinical and Population Health Research Program; Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Division of Epidemiology of Chronic Diseases and Vulnerable Populations; Department of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine; UMass Worcester Prevention Research Center
Date
1-20-2015
Document Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: A TV in the bedroom has been associated with screen time in youth. Youth with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD) have higher rates of screen time, but associations with bedroom TVs are unknown in this population. We examined the association of having a bedroom TV with screen time among youth with ADD/ADHD. METHODS: Data were from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health. Youth 6-17 years whose parent/guardian reported a physician's diagnosis of ADD/ADHD (n = 7,024) were included in the analysis. Parents/guardians reported the presence of a bedroom TV and average weekday TV screen time. Multivariate linear and logistic regression models assessed the effects of a bedroom on screen time. RESULTS: Youth with ADD/ADHD engaged in screen time an average of 149.1 minutes/weekday and 59% had a TV in their bedroom. Adjusting for child and family characteristics, having a TV in the bedroom was associated with 25 minutes higher daily screen time (95% CI: 12.8-37.4 min/day). A bedroom TV was associated with 32% higher odds of engaging in screen time for over 2 hours/day (OR = 1.3; 95% CI: 1.0-1.7). CONCLUSION: Future research should explore whether removing TVs from bedrooms reduces screen time among youth with ADD/ADHD.
Rights and Permissions
Citation: Prev Med Rep. 2015;2:1-3. Link to article on publisher's site
Comments

© 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/)

Related Resources
Link to Article in PubMed
Keywords
  • UMCCTS funding
PubMed ID
25599016
Creative Commons License
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0
Citation Information
Charmaine B. Lo, Molly E. Waring, Sherry L. Pagoto and Stephenie C. Lemon. "A television in the bedroom is associated with higher weekday screen time among youth with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD)" Vol. 2 (2015) ISSN: 2211-3355 (Print)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/stephenie_lemon/76/