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Article
Perinatal management of women with immune thrombocytopenic purpura: survey of United States perinatologists
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • D. Peleg
  • Stephen K. Hunter, University of Iowa
Document Type
Article
Peer Reviewed
1
Publication Date
3-1-1999
NLM Title Abbreviation
Am J Obstet Gynecol
PubMed ID
10076142
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to determine how perinatologists in the United States manage the care of women with immune thrombocytopenic purpura with respect to mode of delivery. Study Design: US members of the Society of Perinatal Obstetricians were surveyed with a 4-question questionnaire. Two mailings were sent. Questions 1 and 2 asked for a response regarding the perinatal management of delivery for women with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura and new-onset disease. The options were cordocentesis or fetal scalp blood sampling and cesarean delivery if the platelet count was <50,000 cells/microL, cesarean delivery if the maternal platelet count was <50,000 cells/microL, cesarean delivery of all women with immune thrombocytopenic purpura, and trial of labor without determining fetal platelet count. The third question asked for an opinion on whether cesarean delivery was protective against intracranial hemorrhage in cases of immune thrombocytopenic purpura. The fourth question asked whether the practitioner was in academic or private practice or both. RESULTS: Among the 1596 perinatologists surveyed, there were 940 informative responses (58.9%). Most would allow a trial of labor for women with chronic (59.0%) or new-onset (66.6%) immune thrombocytopenic purpura. In cases of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura, 31.0% of those responding would perform an invasive procedure to determine fetal platelet count, followed by cesarean delivery if this count was <50, 000 cells/microL. In cases of new-onset immune thrombocytopenic purpura, 25.4% would do so. Of the respondents, 11.8% reportedly considered cesarean delivery protective against intracranial hemorrhage, whereas 56.6% did not and 31.6% were unsure. CONCLUSIONS: The management of women with immune thrombocytopenic purpura remains controversial in the United States. Approximately two thirds of perinatologists would allow a trial of labor without a procedure to determine fetal platelet count. Most physicians surveyed did not consider cesarean delivery to be protective against intracranial hemorrhage.

Keywords
  • Cerebral Hemorrhage/prevention & control,
  • Cesarean Section,
  • Cordocentesis,
  • Delivery,
  • Obstetric/methods,
  • Female,
  • Fetal Blood/cytology,
  • Humans,
  • Male,
  • Perinatology,
  • Platelet Count,
  • Pregnancy,
  • Pregnancy Complications,
  • Hematologic,
  • Prenatal Care,
  • Purpura,
  • Thrombocytopenic,
  • Questionnaires,
  • Trial of Labor,
  • United States
Published Article/Book Citation
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 180:3 Pt 1 (1999) pp.645-649.
Citation Information
D. Peleg and Stephen K. Hunter. "Perinatal management of women with immune thrombocytopenic purpura: survey of United States perinatologists" American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Vol. 180 Iss. 3 Pt 1 (1999) p. 645 - 649 ISSN: 0002-9378
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/stephen_hunter/18/