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Article
The welfare costs of urban outdoor water restrictions
The Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics (2007)
  • Donna Brennan
  • Sorada Tapsuwan, CSIRO
  • Gordon Ingram
Abstract
Outdoor water restrictions are usually implemented as bans on a particular type of watering technology (sprinklers), which allow households to substitute for labour intensive (hand-held) watering. This paper presents a household production model approach to analysing the impact of sprinkler restrictions on consumer welfare and their efficacy as a demand management tool. Central to our empirical analysis is an experimentally derived production function which describes the relationship between irrigation and lawn quality. We demonstrate that for a typical consumer complete sprinkler bans may be little more effective than milder restrictions policies, but are substantially more costly to the household.
Keywords
  • household model,
  • urban water demand,
  • urban water restrictions
Disciplines
Publication Date
2007
Citation Information
Donna Brennan, Sorada Tapsuwan and Gordon Ingram. "The welfare costs of urban outdoor water restrictions" The Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics Vol. 51 Iss. 3 (2007)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/sorada_tapsuwan/2/