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Article
Achieving Adaptive Ends Through Equivocality: A Study of Organizational Antecedents and Consequences
Journal of Business Research
  • Stern Neill, University of Washington - Tacoma Campus
  • Gregory M. Rose, University of Washington - Tacoma Campus
Publication Date
1-1-2007
Abstract
Confronting complex situations is the hallmark of strategic decision-making. While these situations may be perceived as equivocal, organizations must cope, act, and thrive within such ambiguities. This study explores the manifestation and regulation of equivocality during strategic marketing decision-making. The results indicate that organizations that tolerate ambiguity perceive greater equivocality in problem situations and exhibit greater adaptive behavior; however, the findings come with a caveat: while experienced firms may enjoy these benefits, the situation is more complex for firms with limited product-market knowledge.
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Citation Information
Stern Neill and Gregory M. Rose. "Achieving Adaptive Ends Through Equivocality: A Study of Organizational Antecedents and Consequences" Journal of Business Research Vol. 60 Iss. 4 (2007) p. 305 - 315
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/sneill/6/