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Article
Job stress and work well-being in Hong Kong and Beijing : the direct and moderating effects of organizational commitment and Chinese work values
Journal of Psychology in Chinese Societies
  • Oi Ling SIU, Lingnan University, Hong Kong
  • Chang Qiin LU
  • H. C., Kevin CHENG
Document Type
Journal article
Publication Date
1-1-2003
Abstract
This study investigates the direct and moderating effects of organizational commitment and Chinese work values on the stress-well-being relationship. A self-administered questionnaire survey collected data from 386 (197 malts, 179 females, 10 unidentified) and 306 (127 males, 179 females) employees in Hong Kong and Beijing respectively. In general, employees who perceived higher levels of stress reported worse work well-being (job satisfaction, mental and physical well-being). Furthermore, employees who scored high in organizational commitment and Chinese work values reported higher job satisfaction. A series of hierarchical regressions while controlling for age, tenure, and job level, revealed that only Chinese work values were significant moderator of some of the stress-well-being relationship for both samples. For the Beijing sample, Chinese work values were significant moderator of the stress-job satisfaction relationship, whereas organizational commitment was found to be a significant moderator of the stress-mental well-being relationship. For the Hong Kong sample, Chinese work values were found to be significant moderator of the relationship between total stress and physical well-being.
Citation Information
Siu, O.-L., Lu, C.-Q., & Cheng, K. H. C. (2003). Job stress and work well-being in Hong Kong and Beijing: The direct and moderating effects of organizational commitment and Chinese work values. Journal of Psychology in Chinese Societies, 4(1), 7-28.