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Unpublished Paper
NAFTA: The Great Wall of Mexico
ExpressO (2008)
  • Simon P Serrano, Florida Coastal School of Law
Abstract
NAFTA: The Great Wall of Mexico. This article focused on the concept that NAFTA was claimed by the US and Canada to be a manner by which Mexico would be assisted. Although claim, was the premise and guise under which these countries found support from Mexico, the premise clearly did not occur. Ultimately, the implementation has proven to be a method by which Mexico’s self sustenance has been taken. Mexico once exported millions of dollars in Maize (corn), but now imports much more as the US growers have greater subsidies and can produce and ship Mexico’s staple product at a lower price than the Mexican farmers may produce. This benefit to the US farmers has occurred through the implementation of NAFTA. Further, Mexico’s farmers have been forced off their land and either into sweat shops (Maliquadora work) or into US…legally or not. Ultimately, as these are the results of NAFTA, Mexico has not had the opportunity to prosper as it was told it would under NAFTA. Some have claimed that Mother Nature is to blame, as Mexico has suffered billions of dollars in losses occurred from natural disasters. In particular, flooding has caused great damage and losses in the billions of dollars. Were this the case, it seems the Mexican economy would have found a way to rebound and other socio-economic issues, such as the growth of the Maliquadoran industry would not have occurred. The ultimate question posed in this essay is the following: as the US economy was booming subsequent to the implementation of NAFTA and the Mexican economy, was NAFTA simply a guise under which the US hid to benefit the deeper pockets? If so, is NAFTA to blame for the heightened level of illegal immigration which occurred shortly after its implementation?
Keywords
  • NAFATA,
  • Immigration
Disciplines
Publication Date
August 12, 2008
Citation Information
Simon P Serrano. "NAFTA: The Great Wall of Mexico" ExpressO (2008)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/simon_serrano/1/