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Article
Pregnant Women Experiencing IPV: Impact of Supportive and Non-Supportive Relationships with Their Mothers and Other Supportive Adults on Perinatal Depression: A Mixed Methods Analysis
Issues in Mental Health Nursing
  • Shreya Bhandari, Wright State University
  • Linda F. C. Bullock
  • Megan Bair-Merritt
  • Linda Rose
  • Kristen Marcantonio
  • Jacquelyn C. Campbell
  • Phyllis W. Sharps
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
12-1-2012
Abstract
The current study explored the views of women experiencing interpersonal violence (IPV) and their relationship with their mothers or other supportive adult, and determines how this relationship affected perinatal depressive symptoms. The sample consisted of 30 urban and rural pregnant women enrolled in a larger ongoing randomized controlled trial. Data from quantitative instruments that measured depressive symptoms were examined in combination with qualitative interview data collected at baseline and six months post-natal. Women describing positive relationships with their mothers or another supportive adult reported statistically significant lower depressive symptoms scores (p < .05).
Comments

Copyright © 2012 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

DOI
10.3109/01612840.2012.712628
Citation Information
Shreya Bhandari, Linda F. C. Bullock, Megan Bair-Merritt, Linda Rose, et al.. "Pregnant Women Experiencing IPV: Impact of Supportive and Non-Supportive Relationships with Their Mothers and Other Supportive Adults on Perinatal Depression: A Mixed Methods Analysis" Issues in Mental Health Nursing Vol. 33 Iss. 12 (2012) p. 827 - 837 ISSN: 0161-2840
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/shreya_bhandari/31/