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Article
Pregnancy and Intimate Partner Violence: How do Rural, Low-Income Women Cope?
Health Care for Women International
  • Shreya Bhandari, Wright State University - Main Campus
  • Linda F. C. Bullock
  • Kim M. Anderson
  • Fran S. Danis
  • Phyllis W. Sharps
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
9-1-2011
Abstract
We conducted 32 in-depth interviews with 20 rural, low-income, women residing in the United States who were pregnant (n = 12) or 3 months postpartum (n = 8) and had experienced intimate partner violence (IPV). Using purposive sampling and the grounded theory method, we generated a conceptual model of coping. The urge to protect the unborn baby was the primary influence for participants’ decisions about separating from or permanently leaving an abusive relationship. Implications include universal screening for IPV in child-bearing women, inquiry into maternal identity development during pregnancy, and improved resource access for rural, low-income women.
DOI
10.1080/07399332.2011.585532
Citation Information
Shreya Bhandari, Linda F. C. Bullock, Kim M. Anderson, Fran S. Danis, et al.. "Pregnancy and Intimate Partner Violence: How do Rural, Low-Income Women Cope?" Health Care for Women International Vol. 32 Iss. 9 (2011) p. 833 - 854 ISSN: 07399332
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/shreya_bhandari/22/