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Article
Fluoxetine, Smoking, and History of Major Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Faculty Publications, Department of Psychology
  • Bonnie Spring, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • Neal Doran, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • Sherry Pagoto, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • Dennis E. McChargue, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Jessica Werth Cook, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • Katherine Bailey, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • John Crayton, Edward Hines Jr. Veterans Affairs Hospital
  • Donald Hedecker, University of Illinois at Chicago
Date of this Version
11-1-2007
Comments
Published in Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 2007, Vol. 75. No. 1, 85-94. Copyright 2007. Used by permission.
Abstract

The study was a randomized placebo-controlled trial testing whether fluoxetine selectively enhances cessation for smokers with a history of depression. Euthymic smokers with (H+, n = 109) or without (H-, n = 138) a history of major depression received 60 mg fluoxetine or placebo plus group behavioral quit-smoking treatment for 12 weeks. Fluoxetine initially enhanced cessation for H+ smokers (p = .02) but subsequently impaired cessation regardless of depressive history. Six months after quit date, fluoxetine-treated participants were 3.3 times more likely to be smoking (p = .02). Further research is warranted to determine why high-dose fluoxetine produces continuing effects that oppose tobacco abstinence.

Citation Information
Bonnie Spring, Neal Doran, Sherry Pagoto, Dennis E. McChargue, et al.. "Fluoxetine, Smoking, and History of Major Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial" (2007)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/sherry_pagoto/20/