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Article
Coordination of Deglutition and Phases of Respiration: Effect of Aging, Tachypnea, Bolus Volume, and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.
The American journal of physiology
  • R Shaker
  • Sherry Q Li, MD, Lehigh Valley Health Network
  • J Ren
  • W F Townsend
  • W J Dodds
  • B J Martin
  • M K Kern
  • A Rynders
Publication/Presentation Date
11-1-1992
Abstract
The effects of aging, tachypnea, bolus volume, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on the coordination of swallowing with the phases of respiration were studied by concurrent respirography and submental surface electromyography. Study findings showed that in young healthy volunteers, during rest, there is preferential coupling of subconscious swallowing with the expiratory phase of continuous respiration. This preferential coupling of swallowing with expiration was found to increase relative to other phases of respiration during water swallows and tachypnea (P < 0.05). Respiratory phase occurrence of swallowing and postdeglutitive resumption of respiration during exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was found to be significantly different compared with the basal state (P < 0.05). Respiratory phase occurrence of subconscious swallowing in the elderly was found to be different from the young (P < 0.05). Position had no significant effect on the coordination of swallowing and phases of respiration. We concluded that in resting young volunteers the majority of deglutitions are coupled with the expiratory phase of swallowing. This coupling is increased in frequency by the presence of a liquid bolus and tachypnea. And finally, age and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease alter this coordination significantly.
Disciplines
PubMedID
1443150
Document Type
Article
Citation Information

Shaker, R., Li, Q., Ren, J., Townsend, W. F., Dodds, W. J., Martin, B. J., & ... Rynders, A. (1992). Coordination of deglutition and phases of respiration: effect of aging, tachypnea, bolus volume, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The American Journal Of Physiology, 263(5 Pt 1), G750-G755.