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Article
Does a shared culture between nursing home staff and residents influence quality of life?
Common Ground: International Journal of Diversity in Organisations, Communities and Nations (2005)
  • Lucinda M. Deason
  • Sherri L. Wallace
Abstract
In the past, only 27% of the African American elderly population utilized nursing homes compared to 38% of the European American elderly population. In addition, few elderly Latino Americans, Asian Americans, Native Americans, and Pacific Islanders resided in nursing homes. The low utilization rates among the ethnically diverse elderly population might be attributed to a range of barriers to accessing nursing home care, including barriers of language, geography, and cultural familiarity. Moreover, nursing homes tend to be the most segregated health care institutions in the United States, and many facilities shape admission practices and room assignments along racial lines. Currently, demographic data show that the elderly in the United States comprises one of the fastest growing populations and is increasingly becoming more diverse. Recent research reveals that there is a growing increase in ethnically diverse elderly residing in nursing homes. Growth in the ethnically diverse elderly population residing in nursing homes will pose challenges for the industry. One of the major challenges confronting the nursing home industry will be the provision of culturally responsive care. The purpose of this study was to explore how a shared culture between nursing staff and residents influenced residents’ quality of life. The case study approach was employed and we examined three facilities that serve African American, Latino American, and European American residents. The results of this study indicate that a shared culture between staff and residents influenced quality of life.
Keywords
  • Cultural Competence,
  • Ethnically Diverse Elderly,
  • Long Term Care,
  • Nursing Homes
Publication Date
Fall 2005
Citation Information
Lucinda M. Deason and Sherri L. Wallace. "Does a shared culture between nursing home staff and residents influence quality of life?" Common Ground: International Journal of Diversity in Organisations, Communities and Nations Vol. 4 (2005) p. 235 - 242
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/sherri-wallace/9/