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Looking Deathworthy: Perceived Stereotypicality of Black Defendants Predicts Capital-Sentencing Outcomes
Cornell Law Faculty Publications
  • Jennifer L. Eberhardt, Stanford University
  • P G Davies, UCLA
  • Valerie J. Purdie-Vaughns, Yale University
  • Sheri Lynn Johnson, Cornell University Law School
Document Type
Article
Comments
Published in: Psychological Science, Vol. 17, No. 5, pp. 383-386, May 2006
Abstract

Researchers previously have investigated the role of race in capital sentencing, and in particular, whether the race of the defendant or victim influences the likelihood of a death sentence. In the present study, we examined whether the likelihood of being sentenced to death is influenced by the degree to which a Black defendant is perceived to have a stereotypically Black appearance. Controlling for a wide array of factors, we found that in cases involving a White victim, the more stereotypically Black a defendant is perceived to be, the more likely that person is to be sentenced to death.

Date of Authorship for this Version
5-10-2006
Keywords
  • Capital punishment,
  • Race
Disciplines
Citation Information
Jennifer L. Eberhardt, P G Davies, Valerie J. Purdie-Vaughns and Sheri Lynn Johnson. "Looking Deathworthy: Perceived Stereotypicality of Black Defendants Predicts Capital-Sentencing Outcomes" (2006)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/sheri_johnson/12/