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Article
Diagnostic pathology for the cancer patient
Clinical Techniques in Small Animal Practice (2003)
  • Shelley Newman
Abstract

It is necessary to have a cooperative relationship between the clinician and the pathologist, because information from both is critical for determining the best case management and favorable prognosis. The principle roles of the veterinary pathologist are to describe the submitted tissues, to determine the nature of the tumor, and to assess completeness of surgical margins. Recently, the Council of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists (ACVP) appointed an ad hoc committee on oncology to evaluate oncologists' needs by polling members of the Veterinary Cancer Society (VCS). The committee's vision was to review morphologic, immunologic, and molecular techniques so that veterinary pathologists could meet the current and future diagnostic and prognostic needs of oncologic veterinarians. The factors determined to be most important to the VCS members in selecting a diagnostic pathology provider included, in order of importance: (1) reliability of results; (2) short turnaround-time; (3) easy access for consultation; (4) rapport with pathologist; (5) convenience of service; and (6) cost of service. This manuscript will attempt to review improved morphologic, immunologic, and molecular techniques to provide for the future diagnostic and prognostic needs of oncologic veterinarians

Keywords
  • Animals,
  • Biopsy veterinary,
  • Cat Diseases pathology,
  • Cats,
  • Dog Diseases pathology,
  • Dogs,
  • Molecular Diagnostic Techniques veterinary,
  • Neoplasm Staging veterinary,
  • Neoplasms pathology,
  • Neoplasms veterinary,
  • Veterinary Medicine
Publication Date
2003
Citation Information
Shelley Newman. "Diagnostic pathology for the cancer patient" Clinical Techniques in Small Animal Practice Vol. 18 (2003)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/shelley_newman/31/