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Article
The physiologic health care needs of HIV-infected black men on admission to an AIDS-dedicated nursing home.
The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (2003)
  • Sheldon Fields, Florida International University
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to describe the physiologic health care needs of HIV-infected Black men on admission to an AIDS-dedicated nursing home. Participants were 68 Black men aged 26 to 60 years who were admitted to an AIDS-dedicated nursing home in the southern New England area between 1995 and 1999. The participants were very ill and weak on their admission to the nursing home, with most having diagnoses of AIDS (n = 65), an average Karnofsky Performance Scale score of 44 (SD = 14.90), and some degree of mental impairment. The late-stage of disease of the participants was reflected in their multiple symptomatology and functional impairment in activities of daily living. With patients living longer in the chronic disease stages of HIV disease, the results of this study provide support for the further investigation of the most effective long-term care settings for Black men with HIV/AIDS. The results also have implications for the multiple clinical roles nursing can assume within HIV/AIDS long-term care settings.
Publication Date
January, 2003
Citation Information
Sheldon Fields. "The physiologic health care needs of HIV-infected black men on admission to an AIDS-dedicated nursing home." The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care Vol. 14 Iss. 1 (2003)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/sheldon_fields/11/