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Article
Psychophysical auditory filter estimates reveal sharper cochlear tuning in musicians
Journal of the Acoustical Society of America (2014)
  • Gavin M. Bidelman, University of Memphis
  • Jonathan M. Schug, University of Memphis
  • Skyler G. Jennings, University of Utah
  • Shaum P. Bhagat, University of Memphis
Abstract
Musicianship confers enhancements to hearing at nearly all levels of the auditory system from periphery to percept. Musicians' superior psychophysical abilities are particularly evident in spectral discrimination and noise-degraded listening tasks, achieving higher perceptual sensitivity than their nonmusician peers. Greater spectral acuity implies that musicianship may increase auditory filter selectivity. This hypothesis was directly tested by measuring both forward- and simultaneous-masked psychophysical tuning curves. Sharper filter tuning (i.e., higher Q10) was observed in musicians compared to nonmusicians. Findings suggest musicians' pervasive listening benefits may be facilitated, in part, by superior spectral processing/decomposition as early as the auditory periphery.
Keywords
  • Auditory system,
  • Sound discrimination,
  • Musical training,
  • Sound pressure,
  • Hearing
Publication Date
July, 2014
DOI
10.1121/1.4885484
Publisher Statement
Copyright 2014 Acoustical Society of America. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the Acoustical Society of America.

This article appeared in The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, volume 136, issue 1, 2014, and may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.4885484
Citation Information
Gavin M. Bidelman, Jonathan M. Schug, Skyler G. Jennings and Shaum P. Bhagat. "Psychophysical auditory filter estimates reveal sharper cochlear tuning in musicians" Journal of the Acoustical Society of America Vol. 136 Iss. 1 (2014) p. 33 - 39 ISSN: 1520-8524
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/shaum-bhagat/9/