Skip to main content
Contribution to Book
Ghaddafi and the African Union: The End of an Era?
African Union Ten Years After: Solving African Problems with Pan-Africanism and the African Renaissance (2013)
  • Rotimi Ajayi
  • Segun Oshewolo
Abstract
The formation of the African Union in July 2002 followed the tenacity and contributions - material, financial and ideological – of its major proponents including Muammar Ghaddafi of Libya. The Libyan strongman vigorously expressed his belief in an amalgamation of African States that would truncate all colonial boundaries and existing political institutions. Even though the erstwhile Organisation of African Unity metamorphosed into the African Union, the leviathan Ghaddafi and his likes envisaged has remained a mirage. However, in a unique way, the body emerged at a particular historical juncture to fill a gap in Africa’s political evolution, its numerous contradictions and shortfalls notwithstanding. The paper examines the impact of the exit of Ghaddafi from the Africa’s political scene on this ‘pan-African’ body. Will his demise impact positively or otherwise on the contradictions that have bedevilled the continental organisation and in what direction(s)? Does his death and that of his regime portend the end of an era in Africa’s ideological struggle and what future lies in wait for the Union in particular, and African politics in general?
Publication Date
November, 2013
Editor
Muchie, M., Lukhele-Olorunju, P., and Akpor, O
Publisher
Africa Institute of South Africa (AISA)
ISBN
978-0-7983-0291-3
Citation Information
Rotimi Ajayi and Segun Oshewolo. "Ghaddafi and the African Union: The End of an Era?" South AfricaAfrican Union Ten Years After: Solving African Problems with Pan-Africanism and the African Renaissance (2013)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/segun_oshewolo/23/