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Presentation
Time and attention: Interference effects in duration judgement and temporal order memory tasks
New England Sequencing and Timing (NEST) 12th Annual Meeting (2002)
  • Scott W. Brown, University of Southern Maine
  • G. Andrew Smith-Petersen, University of Southern Maine
Abstract
The purpose of this research is to investigate the attentional resource demands of time perception and temporal order memory. Participants judged certain temporal attributes of a series of wordlists presented on a computer screen. The words were displayed for 1.4 s each, and the lists contained 10 words (14 s total), 15 words (21 s total), or 20 words (28 s total). At the end of each list, participants judged either the list duration, the temporal order of the words, or both duration and temporal order. In addition, different groups of participants were exposed to control, easy, or difficult mental workload conditions during list presentation. Participants in the control condition had no additional task requirements other than attending to the lists, participants in the easy (or n-3) condition were required to mentally subtract 3 from a series of random 2-digit numbers read to them by the experimenter, and participants in the difficult (or n-7) condition had to subtract 7 from a series of 2-digit random numbers. The results showed a clear pattern of bidirectional interference between timing and temporal order: The temporal order task interfered with time judgments, and the timing task interfered with temporal order judgments. The mental workload task disrupted both time judgments and temporal order judgments. The results indicate that duration and temporal order are closely related temporal attributes, and suggest that the processing of these attributes relies on the same set of attentional resources.
Keywords
  • time and attention,
  • duration judgement,
  • temporal order memory
Publication Date
March, 2002
Citation Information
Scott W. Brown and G. Andrew Smith-Petersen. "Time and attention: Interference effects in duration judgement and temporal order memory tasks" New England Sequencing and Timing (NEST) 12th Annual Meeting (2002)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/scott_brown_usm/42/