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Presentation
Using time judgement skill training to counteract the interfernce effect in timing
New England Sequencing and Timing (NEST) 16th Annual Meeting (2006)
  • Scott W. Brown, University of Southern Maine
  • Chad J. Desrochers, University of Southern Maine
Abstract
A basic finding in the time perception literature is the interference effect, in which timing performance is disrupted by a concurrent distractor task. Previous research has shown that practice on a distractor task reduces interference on the timing task. According to an attentional model, this result occurs because practice reduces the resource requirements of the distractor task, thereby making more resources available for timing. The present research was designed to determine whether practice on a timing task would also serve to minimize distractor task interference. In Experiment 1, subjects reproduced a series of 6—14 sec intervals in a series of practice trials. Some subjects received feedback regarding the accuracy of each response and others received no feedback. Subsequent testing under dual-task (timing + digit memory) conditions showed that feedback training reduced interference. In Experiment 2, the practice trials included both single-task and dual-task conditions. Later tests showed that feedback training eliminated the interference effect. The results highlight the role of attentional resources and compensatory decision processes in time judgment skill training.
Keywords
  • interference effect,
  • interference effect
Publication Date
March, 2006
Citation Information
Scott W. Brown and Chad J. Desrochers. "Using time judgement skill training to counteract the interfernce effect in timing" New England Sequencing and Timing (NEST) 16th Annual Meeting (2006)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/scott_brown_usm/38/